September 2016 Wrap-Up

Monthly Wrap-Up (1)

I read seven books in September. Of those, five could be considered dystopian. Never thought I’d say that after the dystopian craze died down, though admittedly, the more recent “dystopian” books have a different feel than the ones published during the trend.

Reading

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Short Synopsis: Trilogy following a teenager asked to fight in World War III due to his skill in virtual reality games.

Thoughts: I’ve read books with similar plots in the past, but what set this series apart from the others was the author’s attention to detail in her world-building. The author thought of some potential challenges and usages of the technology used in the story that I’ve never before considered or seen considered in a story. This adds richness to the story.

I read this series after enjoying an arc of The Diabolic by S.J. Kincaid. This series is very different from the author’s forthcoming standalone, and reads on the boarder between middle grade and YA whereas her standalone read as in the hazy area between young adult and adult/new adult.

Rating:4 blue jays

23299512Short Synopsis: In a city where violence breeds monsters, two teenagers must learn to see past their differences to survive.

Thoughts: I stayed up until 2am reading this book. I value my sleep, so this is a rarity. That’s how addictive this book was. I also loved the idea of having violent acts create actual monsters, and the character archetype of a monster who wants to be human is one of my favorites, so I loved August.

Rating:4 blue jays

16299Short Synopsis: In the beginning there are ten people, and by the end there are none.

Thoughts: I’ve been surprised by how much I’ve enjoyed some of the classics I’ve read recently. I suspect this is due to the fact that I’m choosing to read these as opposed to being told to do so for school.

Loved the way the plot all came together to work with the nursery rhyme. Still, I’m glad to have read the most recent version, with “solider boys”, because I think the original would have upset me too much to finish.

Rating: 4 blue jays

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Short Synopsis: Second book in the Six of Crows Duology.

Thoughts: Really enjoyed this one. I loved the way the author made all six narrators distinct from one another. They were all incredibly developed, and I was rarely confused about whose perspective I was reading from.

The pacing was great, and I loved the way the characters had to work around set backs in their plans.

Rating: 

4.5 blue jays

22328546Short Synopsis: Mare was born a red, the lower-class subservient to the godlike silvers. When Mare discovers she has a Silver-like power of her own, she must pretend to be silver.

Thoughts:Some of the plot points felt forced, and I was annoyed with the characters for large portions of the book. The last thirty percent or so was my favorite part.

Based on the reviews of the next book I think I’ll stop here, but I wouldn’t be opposed to reading books unrelated to this one by Victoria Aveyard.

Rating: 3 blue jays

 

 

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Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo

23437156Title: Six of Crows

Author: Leigh Bardugo

Published: September 29, 2015

Genre: Young Adult High Fantasy

Synopsis: When a substance is developed that turns magic users known as Grisha into mindless slaves of great power the world is put at risk. A crew of six thieves are hired to pull off the heist that could save the world.

Review: 

Six of Crows is a great book, and so much fun to read. It was very reminiscent of some of my favorite fantasy novels, but at the same time stood apart from others in this category.

Six of Crows Crew

The strongest aspect of Six of Crows is the characters. In spite of the fact that there are so many narrators, each one comes across as distinct. I especially appreciate the fact that the characters actually acted like thieves.

In many books the character will go around saying that they’re known as an assassin, an experienced solider, or have a lot of experience stealing from important people, but then when it comes down to the act of either murdering or stealing something they hesitate.

This has never come across as realistic to me. At the same time, however, I recognize why many authors chose to portray their “ruthless” characters in this manor. It is difficult to sympathize with a person who can harm or steal from innocent people and feel no remorse, but Bardugo managed to pull it off. 

The relatively small number of characters with magical abilities made them all the more impressive. The main characters in Six of Crows are highly skilled individuals, yet for many of them these skills are natural in origin (ie intelligence), but the characters use them in such a way that seems almost supernatural.

Six of Crows Map

That said, the magic that we did get to see was a great addition to the story. My favorite aspects of the first book and a half that I read of the Grisha Trilogy was the world-building, so I was more than happy to reenter that world in Six of Crows.

Bardugo has created a very complex magic system different from what I’ve seen in many fantasy novels (especially YA) where the magic is often glossed over. Though this novel has much less focus on the magic system than the Grisha Trilogy, it managed to further expand upon it by showing what a Grisha’s power can do when pushed to extremes.

The world itself was expanded upon as well. I really liked how many of the characters in this novel were from very different parts of this world as this isn’t something we often get to see in fantasy, which often focus on one region of the world the writer has created.

The only negative criticism I have to offer is related to the reason I did not finish the Grisha Trilogy. That is to say that a significant portion of this novel was spent on build up. This is not to say that nothing happens, quite to the contrary, things seem to go wrong quite often. What I mean is that I spent most of the book anticipating the climax of the actual theft as opposed to anything the characters were trying to overcome at that particular moment.

I really wanted to love the Grisha Trilogy because I have a signed copy (see the image below), but am so glad that I can now consider myself a fan of Bardugo thanks to this book. I was hesitant to read this one because I thought I might need to finish the Grisha Trilogy first, but was pleased to find that this duology stands on its own.

Siege and Storm

In any case, I managed to get a hold of a signed bookplate. Used as a book mark, really like the way my copy of Six of Crows looks:

Be Dangerous

What readers should know: Though this book keeps everything very vague, one of the narrators was forced to work in a brothel against her will. She has since left this profession behind, but still bares negative effects of her time there.

As stated in this review the thieves in this book truly act as thieves. This means that some of the narrators steal and kill people throughout the story. There is also some language.

Rating: This is a really great book. I highly recommend it to fans of fantasy and people trying to get into fantasy.

4.5 blue jays