Top 10 Best Books of 2016

This is my first ever Top Ten Tuesday post. I don’t usually participate, but it just so happened that the idea I had for my next blog post corresponded with their theme, so I decided to participate.

Top Ten Tuesday is a weekly meme hosted by Brook and the Bookish. Read the original version of this topic here.

These are my top ten favorite books I read this year in no particular order.

1916185226228034

The first two books in the Broken Earth Series by N.K. Jemisin are phenomenal. The world-building is some of the best I’ve seen. I liked the first book more than the second, but the second is still good enough to make this list.

I read the first book in the middle of a massive reading slump and with a lot happening in my life, but it managed to get through to me all the same. That’s impressive.

I wouldn’t recommend this to the younger readers of this blog because this is definitely an adult book, but for everyone else reading this who likes fantasy I highly recommend picking these books up.

22299763\

I loved the first book of Leigh Bardugo’s Six of Crow’s Duology, and the sequel was just as good. I loved the way the cast meshed so well with one another. One perspective never overwhelmed the others. I loved reading from each and every character. The anti-human trafficking message is great as well.

28190254

This book surprised me. I expected it to be terrible, but this prequel is better than the main series. I love the complexity of Darkstalker’s character: how I’m never sure if he is the hero or the villain. It’s something I don’t see a lot of in middle grade novel, but I do wish the author had chosen a name other than Darkstalker.

Darkstalker is a prequel to the Wings of Fire Series, but can be read as a standalone.

16299

And Then There Were None is my first Agatha Christie novel, and I did not expect to enjoy it as much as I did. This book is a classic for a reason. Agatha Christie knows how to tell a mystery. My only qualms are that I had trouble connecting with the characters because of the distant narration, and I’m quite glad to have read the modified version as opposed to the original . . .

1873942628698036

These two books are very different but technically part of the same series, so I’m lumping them together.

The Bands of Mourning is the sixth book in the Mistborn Series, and you definitely need to have read from at least the first book in the spinoff, The Alloy of Law,  and preferably the original trilogy too to understand what is happening.

The Bands of Mourning has a different tone from the previous books in the series with more focus on discovery, but was still excellent.

Mistborn: Secret History is a novella that it’s impossible to say anything about without spoilers except that “There is always another secret,” and you need to have read at least the first three Mistborn books before this one, and preferably most of the books in Brandon Sanderson’s Cosmere universe too. I highly recommend Mistborn: Secret History to fans of Sanderson’s Cosmere, but no one else because you will be too confused.

23299512

This Savage Song kept me up late into the night, and I read it twice: once in physical form and once in audio because I liked it so much. The sequel is one of my most anticipated reads of next year.

I love August’s internal struggle as a monster who wanted to be human, and can’t wait to see what happens next in this fascinating world.

26836910

Note: I received a copy of this book from the publisher, but was not asked to put it on this list. Opinions are my own. 

The Diabolic had great timing for me. It’s the book that marked an end to the reading slump I mentioned earlier. It also contains some of my favorite tropes. I love space operas and characters from one social group masquerading as a character from another social group.

18966806

I love Morning Star for similar reasons to the book above as it contains similar reasons to the book I mentioned above as it is also sci-fi and contains a character from one group masquerading as a person from another group.

This is the only book on this list I went to the book store to buy because I couldn’t wait the amount of time it would take for shipping to get this book. I was not disappointed.

The Dragonet Prophecy 4.5 Star Review

13228487Title: The Dragonet Prophecy (Wings of Fire #1)

Author: Tui T. Sutherland

Published: July 21, 2012

Synopsis: Five young dragons raised in secret are the only ones believed to be able to stop the war between the seven dragon tribes. Locked below ground, knowing nothing of the world above, there isn’t much they can do to help the war effort. When the dragonets of prophecy learn that one of there own is threatened, they escape into the wider world where they will be forced  to face their destiny.

Thoughts: This book was my favorite middle grade fantasy novel I read in 2015. Admittedly, I only read eight middle grade novels last year so I’m not sure if that’s saying much. However, it doesn’t change the fact that I really enjoyed this novel.

Dragons have always been a fascination of mine. When I was younger I went through a phase where I was obsessed dragons, and dragon books in particular.

Part of the reason I rated this book so highly is due to the fact that had I read it while being a member of the intended audience there is little doubt this could have become one of my favorite books of all time. This is something I take into consideration while reviewing middle grade books.

As it was, this book caused me to start sketching dragons the way I used to all the time when I was around twelve.

I try to go out of my way to find books written from nonhuman perspectives. It seems often that when authors try to write from the perspectives of aliens or mythological creatures they often fall into writing about creatures that appear to be whatever the author claims they are, but act human.

There are reasons for this, primarily relating to the fact that its easier to make someone care about someone else if they have something in common with that other person/creature, and the fact that it is easier for the authors to write from a perspective closer to their own. However, in the rare instances when inhuman perspectives are written very well I really enjoy them. I felt that the way the dragons narrated this novel was one of these rare exceptions.

In spite of my praise for this novel’s choice of perspective, it was not without flaws. The plot is fairly standard for a fantasy novel. It involves a mysterious prophecy in which our five main characters are the chosen ones destined to save the world.

What readers should know: For a middle grade novel this book is fairly violent as it involves dragons who act like dragons. There are minor human characters killed by dragons and dragons killed by other dragons.

Rating: This was an enjoyable middle grade fantasy novel.

4.5 blue jays